Guide to using the learning objectives


Learning Objectives for Chapter Four Reading and Evaluating Research

 

 

Pages 112-121

 

1.                Outline3three methods you can use to choose an interesting research article.

2.                Choose1an article and explain2 how you chose this article and why you chose it.

3.                Describe2the purpose of the Abstract.

4.                Discuss2what you should know after reading an Abstract.

5.                Outline3four things that the introduction to the article should tell you.

6.                Authors often argue that their research is methodologically superior to previous research by pointing to one of four weaknesses in previous research. List1those four general weaknesses and, for each weakness, describe2 away of changing a study to overcome that weakness.

7.                List1six common ways that new research extends existing research.

8.                The first time through the introduction section of an article, you should ask yourself two questions. Describe2 those two questions. After reading the introduction to the article you selected earlier for this chapter, provide3answers to these two questions about the introduction.

9.                After reading the introduction once and doing background reading, describe2the six questions you should ask (and answer) before moving on to the method section. Provide3 answers to these questions for the article you selected.

10.           Outline3five questions you should be able to answer before leaving the method section. Provide3 answers to these questions after reading the method section for the article you selected.

 

Pages 121-127

 

11.           Explain2what is meant by the following, "the results section tells you how the hypotheses did."After reading the results section of the article you selected, provide3 a response to the question "how did thehypothesis do?"

12.           Produce5(as appropriate) a listing for each of the following from your article:

a.     basic descriptive statistics

b.    results of manipulation checks

c.     results relating to hypotheses

d.    other statistically significant results.

13.           After reading the results section, provide3 answers to the following questions based on your article:

a.     How is a participant's behavior converted into a score?

b.    What are the average scores for the different groups?  Which type(s) or group(s) of participants score higher?  Which groups score lower?

c.     What type of statistical analysis did the authors use?

d.    Do the results appear to support the authors' hypotheses? 

 

 

Pages 127-140

 

14.           Define1each of the following:

a.     direct replication,

b.    systematic replication, and

c.     conceptual replication.

15.           Provide3an example of each of the following:

a.     direct replication,

b.    systematic replication, and

c.     conceptual replication.

16.           Discuss2how a direct replication could address each of the following:

a.     suspicion of fraud,

b.    suspicion of Type 1 errors, and

c.     suspicion of Type 2 errors.

17.           Explain2why people should be cautious about basing decisions on a single research study.

18.           Explain2how a systematic replication could accomplish each of the following:

a.     improving power,

b.    improving external validity, and

c.     improving construct validity.

19.           Describe2the advantages of doing a conceptual replication.

20.              Read a research article in a journal. Then, propose5 five ways you could extend that research.


Guide to using the learning objectives

Chapter Objectives Menu

Chapter 4 Menu

Research Design Explained Home page